emacs

I was reading about the Emacs org-roam mode, and came across the Zettelkasten method of notetaking. I hadn’t seen this term before, but the idea of taking notes with cross-referenced index cards sounded familiar. Where did I read about it? Ah yes… in Umberto Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum, the main character Casaubon (an ex-academic who makes a living as a “detective of knowledge”) uses boxes of index cards to keep track of ideas.
Read more

A simple example of literate programming: literating the Emacs configuration file

I like Donald Knuth’s idea of literate programming, but unfortunately, I don’t have too many opportunities to write literate programs. A couple of months ago, I was inspired by this article, and decided to rewrite my Emacs configuration file using org-mode’s literate programming tool Babel. I was quite pleased by the result, but I must admit that it was an exercise in literate programming only in the most superficial sense of the word.
Read more

How I run emacs in client/server mode under macOS

Many articles are available about running Emacs in client/server mode. However, when I tried to do it in my particular environment (macOS 11.0.1 Big Sur, using zsh), some tweaks were still needed. So I figured that it’s probably useful to document my setup. In macOS, the Emacs executable is /Applications/Emacs.app/Contents/MacOS/Emacs. To run Emacs in its regular (non-server) operation mode, I defined two shell commands in .zshrc: emacs runs Emacs in GUI mode in a macOS window, whereas emacsnw runs Emacs in text mode within the terminal.
Read more

About a month ago, I rewrote my Emacs config script in the style of literate programming. Emacs has a markup language (org-mode) that makes it easy to mix rich text with code. I did it mostly out of curiosity. At that time, I didn’t know if writing something as trivial as a config file this way was a good idea in terms of practicality. After a month of tweaking, I am now convinced that It was helpful.
Read more